Going Home…!!!

Recently I’ve been in the thick of resuscitations. The 4 month old baby was the mega downer of them all. I seem to have been to a lot of kids in the past year and attended coroners inquests as a result. All very stressful but usually I am able to deal with it in my own time and in my own way. Some take longer to get over than others and some just lurk in the back of the sub-conscious and appear at the most unexpected moments. My temper is getting better now that I realise I’m not infallible. I hurt and cry just like anyone else.

In my last seven resuscitations (all within a five day shift) I’ve actually got four back. (When I say I that includes my crewmate at the time). All four people arrested and presented with VF. Using the new resus guidelines CPR and/or shocks were administered. The biggest driver of them all was ‘minimum time off the chest’. Keep the time between chest compressions and checking monitors/pulses etc short. And it works. Out of the four people resuscitated one died later in A/E, one ended up in ICU to undergo therapeutic induced hypothermia and the other two regained consciousness before arriving at the hospital. All three have been discharged from hospital with no neurological deficit.

To have so many successful outcomes in such a short space of time is bizarre. The survival to discharge of post cardiac arrest patients is very small. The survival to hospital admission is also very small. But since using the new guidelines and been aggressive in cardiac arrest management (not violent but thorough) we are starting to see a difference. And seeing all three patients with their families going home is the biggest buzz ever. So like I said I hurt and cry like anyone else, I also smile and laugh a lot just the same. And at the end of a shift I can go home too!

going-home

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18 Responses to Going Home…!!!

  1. Bendy Girl says:

    Hey Big Bro, I’m really glad to hear you’ve had such success lately. I know it doesn’t in any way make up for those who can’t be helped but I hope it makes you feel a bit better, lil sis x

  2. medicblog999 says:

    That’s one hell of a success ratio!!
    Well done to you and your mate. It’s always good to have the good outcomes to balance the bad.
    Ying and yang!

  3. Anne Onnymous says:

    A teenager we know had to be “brought back” on Friday. One of the police who had to attend the scene is a friend and he too was very affected by it, particularly at the point at which it was thought she had died. She was put into therapeutic induced hypothermia but is now showing very positive signs of improvement. I thought of you during it all and how it must be to be continually at the sharp end of life and death as you are.

  4. Dave says:

    I couldn’t comment on your previous post, didn’t know what to say…

    I relation to this post, I have in nearly 5 years, never had a patient survive more than 60 minutes at the hospital. Never had one walk out. Hopefully soon.

    Depending on what you read the save rate is about 3%, so your 43% in 5 days is sensational. Bloody hectic though…

    Regards
    Dave

  5. Dave says:

    I couldn’t comment on your previous post, didn’t know what to say…

    I relation to this post, I have in nearly 5 years, never had a patient survive more than 60 minutes at the hospital. Never had one walk out. Hopefully soon.

    Depending on what you read the save rate is about 3%, so your 43% in 5 days is sensational. Bloody hectic though…

    Regards
    Dave
    Sorry, forgot to add great post! Can’t wait to see your next post!

  6. We take the victories where we can. It’s better than simply showing up and being a grief mop.

    Good on ya for the success ratio!

  7. piratedani says:

    Great to have you back.
    Missed ya we have.
    *hug*

    now then…… swab team 6? ;)

    ps: going home? when I saw that, I thought you were announcing that you planned to leave the service to do something more… sedate. Im glad your not.

  8. Rach says:

    Very proud of you as ever, was just thinking I hadn’t heard from you in a while think I owe you an email…take care…xx

  9. Stressedoutcop says:

    You and yours are top people .. appreciate the great job you are all doing. Regards SOC

  10. Wow!
    I’ll put the kettle on.

  11. kingmagic says:

    Lil sis…thanks. It certainly does seem better when it works. x

    medicblog999…nature of the job I suppose. Plus it helps to have a good crew mate.

    Ann Onnymous…thanks. I dont mind the sharp end when its worthwhile, its the crappy blunt bits that hurt. (That sounds a bit pervy…did’nt come out right!)

    Dave…thanks. People at work are avoiding me as I seem to have become a ‘resus magnet’!

    Mr. Nighttime…nicely put. Cheers.

    piratedani…Thanks Dani. SWAB Team 6 will be here soon, I’m on nights tonight. As for leaving the service, I’m addicted to it…the best (and sometimes worst) job in the world.

    Rach…thanks. Glad your getting better and things going well at work. x

    Stressedoutcop…sentiments reciprocated. We need each others help at times.

    uphilldowndale…milk, one sugar please!

  12. Louise says:

    Have been in the job about 18 months now and not got one back yet! Had a couple of close calls in terms of expecting a patient to arrest en route and managing to hold it off, which can be equally satisfying.

    I think we all get ‘bad’ runs, sometimes its arrests, sometimes its RTA’s, sometimes its sick kiddies but ultimately the variety is a main reason I do the job.

    The bad ones are, unfortunately, the nature of the beast that is life. We are in a position where we see it in all its horror and glory.

    How many times have you been told “I couldn’t do your job”?

    We all build walls and coping mechanisms to wade the minefield of feelings this job gives us but we will always go back.

    As you say yourself its the best (and sometimes worst) job in the world and I certainly couldn’t imagine doing anything else.

    Keep on trucking!

  13. Paramedic Pete says:

    Good news of the successful resus’. ROSC seems to be much more common these days. I wonder why it took so long to change and the lack of results in between. When I first started it was ‘Blue hearts won’t start’, seems like we have come full circle, once more.

  14. kingmagic says:

    Louise…coping mechanisms start to fail when you are on nights and are assailed by wave after wave of stupid, useless people dialling 999 for the merest of things. The plus jobs remind you of the reason we do the job in the first place (apart from paying the mortgage). Normally I cope very well…only recently through tiredness and the shit we were getting at work (punters and bosses) did I momentarily falter. But through that experience I remembered that we are only human…so I make sure now that I get plenty of zeds when poss!

    Paramedic Pete… we are getting more positive results which seems bizzare seeing as we have been using the new resus guidelines for some time now. I remember when I first started and the buzz words were ‘blue hearts dont start’ but this was put on the back burner for a lot of years. Things do seem to go full circle in the ambulance service…maybe we might start looking after the right kind of patients rather than trying to hit targets and getting a big yellow truck stuffed with paramedics/technicians to them before they have even put the phone down and we dont know what we are going to until we are feet away from the location!

  15. nickopotamus says:

    That is some survival rate mate – you must be doing something right! Great evidence for the ‘new’ guidelines, must use this when next trying to shout “time on chest is much more important than drugs” into a first year medical student’s head…

  16. Paramedic Pete says:

    KingMagic> Sounds like we might be of a similar vintage. The obsession with targets keep leading UK Ambulance services further into a big dead end. In the mean time patients who actually need help get lost amongst the panic attacks and faints.
    I moved onto sunnier pastures about 5 years ago, in this strange place they actually gives a toss about clinical care. Best move I’ve ever made.

  17. Fantastic web-site! I’m loving it! I’ll appear once again for sure!!

  18. lece says:

    Great website! I’m loving it! I’ll come back for sure!!

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